Canids Specialist Group

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Members

:

Secretariat:

Claudio Sillero-Zubiri - Chair

WildCRU, University of Oxford, UK

Claudio’s main interests are the ecology of wild carnivores, disease dynamics and the relationships between wildlife and rural communities. After decades working on Ethiopian wolves and other canid species, a solitary forager living on large family packs in the highlands of Ethiopia, he remains fascinated by the adaptability of canid society, and how wolves, wild dogs and foxes continue to thrive in many diverse habitats across the globe. A conservation biologist at the University of Oxford, where he is the Deputy Director of the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Claudio works on several rare or threatened carnivore species spanning four continents.

Michael Hoffmann - Red List Authority Coordinator

IUCN Species Survival Commission, Cambridge, UK

Michael Hoffmann, a South African national, is currently based in the offices of the United Nations Environment Programme – World Conservation Monitoring Centre in Cambridge, UK, where he serves as Senior Scientific Officer to IUCN’s Species Survival Commission. Mike previously held positions in the IUCN Global Species Programme and with Conservation International. He is a mammalogist by training, having spent time at the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit at the University of Oxford and the Mammal Research Institute at the University of Pretoria in South Africa. He co-edited the 2004 Canid Action Plan, and is co-editor of the 6-volume Mammals of Africa. He currently serves as Red List Authority Coordinator for the Canid Specialist Group and is also Chair of the IUCN Red List Committee.

Jed Murdoch - Programme Co-ordinator

University of Vermont, USA

Jed is a faculty member of the Wildlife and Fisheries Biology Program at the University of Vermont. He has been involved with the Canid Specialist Group since 2004 and now serves as Programme Coordinator and co-Editor of Canid Biology & Conservation. Much of his research focuses on understanding the behavior and ecology of wild canids and addressing questions related to their conservation and management. Most studies have involved foxes, including corsac fox, red fox, and kit fox, but also larger canids like wolves and wild dogs, and occurred at sites in the USA, Africa, and Asia.

Karen DeMatteo - Projects Officer; Coordinator, Amazonian Canids Working Group

Washington University in St. Louis, USA; WildCare Institute at the Saint Louis Zoo, USA

Karen’s research interests are diverse, focused on understanding the basic biology and ecological interactions that occur at both the species and community level. She has used a variety of approaches to address these research questions including behavioural ecology, physiological ecology, reproductive physiology, general ecology, ecological genetics and ecological niche modelling. Her research has been conducted with both wild and captive populations, as the latter can provide insight into basic biological information that may be impossible to collect in the field. Karen has conducted field research in several Neotropical countries including Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay. The majority of these field studies have been focused on understanding the community structure of Neotropical carnivores and developing regional conservation strategies.

Candy d'Sa - Assistant Editor, CBC

UK

Candy works as an Animal Behaviour Consultant and Expert Witness in animal law based in Hampshire and is an advocate and expert on issues of animal welfare and behaviour. She completed her PhD in 2003 which focused on dominance and hierarchies in feral farm cats. Candy’s research has included the behaviour and ecology of captive arctic foxes in Scotland, work on the endangered Canadian swift fox captive breeding and reintroduction programme in Canada and research in Italy for a documentary on domestic and wild dogs. Candy has conducted demographic and behavioural studies of the critically endangered Ethiopian wolf in the Bale Mountains National Park in southern Ethiopia along with involvement in the implementation of a vaccination programme for sympatric semi-feral domestic dogs. She has also worked as a dog behaviourist for the Geneva International Centre for Humanitarian Demining (GICHD) and has been Associate Editor of Canid Biology and Conservation since 2001.

Jorgelina Marino - Webmaster; Coordinator, Ethiopian Wolf Working Group

WildCRU, University of Oxford, UK

Jorgelina studied biology in Argentina obtained her doctorate at Oxford university in 2003. Jorgelina is a conservation scientist at WildCRU and is the Director for Science of the Ethiopian Wolf Conservation Programme, a species she has studied since the 1990s. Jorgelina’s areas of expertise are highland ecology, carnivore ecology and sociobiology, spatial ecology, species distribution modeling, population dynamics and monitoring. Her current work is on species conservation in mountains and arid lands, and how they are affected by land use and climate change. She runs the People & Wildlife Initiative (www.peopleandwildlfie.org.uk).

Yennifer Hernandez - Social Media

Yen is a wildlife biologist, vet tech and canid passionate, based in Uruguay, but with work experience also in Argentina, Namibia, the Netherlands and Germany). In the last few years Yen has worked on crab-eating foxes, Pampas foxes, black-backed jackals, Cape foxes and bat-eared foxes. As the social media editor for the CSG Yen managers our social media platforms and helps with the website. As a freelance wildlife technician Yen has worked for consultancy companies, Natural History National Museum (Carnivores Laboratory, Uruguay), Faculty of Sciences (Uruguay), NGO Conservation Canines (University of Washington, USA) and The Neotropical Raptors Network (USA).

David Macdonald - Adviser to the Chair

WildCRU, University of Oxford, UK

David established the Canid Specialist Group and was its first Chair. A professor of wildlife conservation at the University of Oxford he is the founder and Director of the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit. His research interests range broadly across diverse topics in wildlife conservation and management. Nonetheless, from his early work on red foxes, David retains an emphasis on the behavioural ecology of carnivores. He has worked on wolves in Italy, crab-eating foxes in Brazil, golden jackals in Israel, Arctic foxes in Russia, and Ethiopian wolves amongst others. More recently David’s work has become interdisciplinary, with an increasing interest in issues of environmental policy, economics and research strategy.

David Mech - Adviser to the Chair

US Geological Survey, USA

Dave is a Senior Research Scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey and Adjunct Professor at University Minnesota. He has a B.S. from Cornell and Ph.D. and Honorary Doctorate from Purdue. He has published 450 articles and 10 books. Since 1958, he has studied wolves in Minnesota, Isle Royale, Alaska and Yellowstone and lived weeks each summer (1986-2010) with wolf packs in Ellesmere Island, Canada. He chaired the IUCN Wolf Specialist Group (1978-2013) and founded the International Wolf Center [http://www.wolf.org]. He has consulted on wolves in Italy, Spain, Portugal and Croatia; leopards and lions in Kenya and Tanzania; tigers, elephants, lions and other species in India. Awards include the Wildlife Society’s Aldo Leopold Award for Distinguished Service to Wildlife Conservation.

Core:

Anders Angerbjörn - Coordinator, Arctic Fox Working Group

Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Sweden

Anders has been working with the arctic fox project since 1986. The population is even more threatened today with a maximum of 200 foxes in all of Fennoscandia. This project investigates different aspects of the artic fox including demography, genetics and behaviour. They have tested the effects of extra feeding, red fox control and treatment against parasites. These experiments are now implemented in the official action program. Their analyses of long-term data show that arctic foxes are especially dependent on lemmings. Previously the regular rodent cycles was absent in Lapland; however, it is not back with strong positive effects on arctic fox breeding.

Axel Moehrenschlager - Contact Person, Reintroductions & Translocations

Centre for Conservation Research, Calgary Zoo, Alberta, Canada

The beginning of Axel’s career included raising US captive wolf pups and radio-tracking wolf-hunted wood bison in Canada’s Wood Buffalo National Park. Over the last 20 years he has worked on swift fox reintroduction in Canada and Montana and has collaborated on studies of demographic growth, disease prevalence, genetic structure and habitat use. This includes Mexican/U.S collaborations on guild dynamics of swift and kit foxes with coyotes and red foxes. Axel founded the Centre for Conservation Research at the Calgary Zoological Society in Canada, a group focused on reintroduction issues and the science of community-based conservation internationally. Axel chairs the North American Section of the SSC Reintroduction Specialist Group and is an Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Calgary.

Ben Sacks - Coordinator, Taxonomy & Nomenclature Working Group

University of California, Davis, USA

Ben employs genomic and field-based methodologies to understand evolutionary histories of particular canid species and the generalities that unite their evolutionary pathways. Much of his research is motivated by curiosity about the relationships between individual behaviour and population-level processes, including the historical roles played by behavioural plasticity and adaptation in the evolution of niche specialization. He is especially interested in research that directly or indirectly helps us conserve endangered canid populations and species. In addition to canids, he works with his students on a broad range of and other mammalian carnivores.

Brian Cypher - Coordinator, Island, Kit & Swift Fox Working Group

California State University-Stanislaus, USA

Brian is the Associate Director and a Research Ecologist with the California State University – Stanislaus, Endangered Species Recovery Program. His primary research interest is the ecology and conservation of wild canids. He has worked with wolves, coyotes, grey foxes, red foxes, kit foxes and island foxes. Brian serves on recovery teams for San Joaquin kit foxes and island foxes. He currently is involved in research and conservation efforts for endangered San Joaquin kit foxes and island foxes and other sensitive species in California.

Dada Gottelli - Contact Person, Canid Genetics

Zoological Society of London/ Institute of Zoology, London, UK

Dada was a member of the Ethiopian Wolf Conservation Project based in the Bale Mountains NP (Ethiopia) from 1988 until 1992. Since 1992, she has been working in the genetic group at the Institute of Zoology studying the genetics of various species, including the Ethiopian wolf.

Karen Bauman - Contact Person, Conservation Breeding

Saint Louis Zoo, USA

Karen Laurenson - Coordinator, Disease & Epidemiology Working Group

Frankfurt Zoological Society

Karen, trained as a veterinarian and ecologist, has conducted epidemiological research at the wildlife-human-livestock for 8 years. For the last 10 years she has been working in an NGO as a conservationist, developing and management projects in Africa, supporting institutional development and carrying out site level planning. She is now based in Ethiopia and seconded to the Ethiopian Wildlife Conservation Authority.

Luigi Boitani - Coordinator, Wolf (Europe) Working Group

University of Rome, Italy

Luigi is a professor of animal ecology and conservation biology at the University of Rome since 1987. He has been a member of the Steering Committee of IUCN/SSC since 1996. He has been the Chair of the IUCN/SSC Large Carnivore Initiative for Europe since 2002.

Mauro Lucherini - Coordinator, Southern Cone (Foxes) Working Group

GECM, Departamento Biología, Bioquímica y Farmacia, UNS, Bahía Blanca, Argentina

Mauro Lucherini has started working on canids (the red fox) for his PhD thesis in Italy, his native country. Since 1996 he has led carnivore research and conservation projects in Argentina, where he co-founded the Mammal Behavioral Ecology Group (GECM), a team mostly devoted to Argentine carnivore conservation biology. He has been a researcher associated to Universidad Nacional del Sur and CONICET (the Argentine Council for Scientific Research) since 2004. Mauro has significantly contributed to the understanding of the ecology and population status of several little-known carnivores, including the Pampas fox and Culpeo, and exploring multidisciplinary approaches to respond to their conservation needs and to human-carnivore conflicts. He has been deeply committed to the development of the next generation of carnivore conservationists in Latin America, supervising numerous postgraduate projects and favoring their interactions with international students.

Michael Phillips - Coordinator, Wolf (North America) Working Group

Turner Endangered Species Fund, USA

Mike has been involved in wolf restoration and conservation throughout the United States for over 30 years. He served as the first leader for both the historic effort to restore the red wolf to the southeastern U.S. and the grey wolf to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. He has served on every Mexican wolf recovery since 1995. For many years Mike was a member of the IUCN Wolf Specialist Group before it joined with the Canid Specialist Group. In 1997 he and Ted Turner co-founded the Turner Endangered Fund and the Turner Biodiversity Divisions. The organizations now represent the world’s most significant private efforts to arrest the extinction crisis. Mike was elected to the Montana legislature in 2007 and will serve in the State Senate through at least December 2015.

Nucharin Songsasen - Coordinator, Dhole Working Group; Contact Person, Canid Genetics

Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, USA

Nucharin received her DVM from Kasetsart University (Thailand), her MSc in biomedical sciences, and PhD in cryobiology from the University of Guelph (Canada). She is a Research Biologist at the Center for Species Survival at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute where she leads the Conservation of Rare Canids program. Her current investigations focus on (1) developing innovative technology to preserve fertility of wild canids, (2) understanding reproductive biology, semiochemicals and establishing assisted reproductive technology to manage maned wolf, (3) determining the impact of human development on wild canids in Brazilian grassland, and (4) assessing ecological status and threats to wild dholes in Thailand. She is the AZA’s Canid Taxon Advisory group and Maned Wolf Species Survival Plan reproductive advisor.

Olaf Bininda-Emonds - Coordinator, Taxonomy & Nomenclature Working Group

AG Systematics and Evolutionary Biology, IBU - Faculty V, Germany

Olaf’s background is in the areas of phylogenetics, systematics and taxonomy, with a long standing interest in Carnivora. Although his systematic research is increasingly molecular-based, he is also well acquainted with the use and interpretation of morphological data. Using supertree construction, he combined these two types of data to produce two complete and dated species-level evolutionary trees for Carnivora (in 1999 and 2012), with the latter study including conservation information. In 2007, the former study was later included in a supertree for virtually all living species of mammal that Olaf constructed with numerous colleagues.

Raymond Van der Meer - Contact Person, Conservation Breeding

EAZA Canid and Hyaenid TAG, The Netherlands

Raymond is a senior curator in Amersfoort Zoo, the Netherlands. In 2001 he became responsible for the coordination of three hyena programmes under the umbrella of the European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA). The EAZA has 345 member institutions in 41 different countries, which together coordinate and manage 380 European breeding programmes. Within EAZA, 42 Taxon Advisory Groups (TAG’s) are responsible for the production of Regional Collection Plans (RCP). In 2008, he became chair of the Canid and Hyaenid TAG. Since this time they have worked on a revision of the RCP and organisation within the TAG. They strongly believe in cooperation with other zoo associations and organizations focused on species conservation, such as the IUCN Specialist Groups.

Rogerio Cunha de Paula - Coordinator, Maned Wolf Working Group

CENAP / ICMBio, Atibaia, Brazil

Rogerio is a Brazilian biologist and currently is the chief of the National Research Center for Carnivore Conservation (CENAP) within an Environmental Ministry’s agency (ICMBio). Additionally he is an associate researcher at the NGO Instituto Pro-Carnivoros. He has been coordinating and conducting research on carnivore ecology and conservation throughout Brazil specially focused on canids in the Cerrado biome. As a government agent, he supervises the National Action Plans involving the carnivore species and specifically coordinates the Maned Wolf National Action Plan. He has been conducting research on maned wolf in Brazil through the “Maned Wolf Conservation Program”. Within the Canid Specialist Group he has been connecting the maned wolf researchers and developing common strategies to the species in the entire South America though the Maned Wolf Working Group.

Rosie Woodroffe - Coordinator, African Wild Dog Working Group

Institute of Zoology, London, UK

Rosie is a Senior Research fellow at the Zoological Society of London and Visiting Professor at Imperial College London. Her work focuses on the coexistence of people and wildlife, especially resolving conflicts and managing disease transmission. Her efforts to conserve the African wild dog span 15 years and include a field conservation project in Kenya and co-leading the Rangewide Conservation Process for wild dogs and cheetah. She has also worked with island foxes, bat-eared foxes and black-backed jackals and still desperately wants to work with dhole.

Tim Coonan - Coordinator, Island, Kit & Swift Fox Working Group

National Park Service, Channel Islands National Park, USA

Tim, a biologist with the US National Park Service at Channel Islands National Park, has been studying and managing island foxes for over 20 years. He directed a monitoring program which detected a massive decline of island foxes in the mid-1990s. He directed the research effort that identified the cause of the decline (golden eagle predation) and led to the park's ten-year island fox recovery program, which included captive breeding and reintroduction of island foxes. He helped develop the recovery actions in the draft USFWS island fox recovery plan and since 1999 has led the interagency island fox conservation group. With co-authors Cathy Schwemm and Dave Garcelon, he wrote a recent book on island fox biology and conservation.

Yadvendradev Jhala - Coordinator, Wolf (Asia) Working Group

Wildlife Institute of India, India

For the past 15 years, since his doctoral work on the Indian wolf and blackbuck in 1990 at VPI&SU, Virginia, Yadvendradev has been researching Indian canids. He currently holds the position of Sr. Professor and Head the Department of Animal Ecology & Conservation Biology at the Wildlife Institute of India based in Dehradun. His other research and conservation interests include Asiatic lions, tigers and striped hyenas, all of which have ongoing research projects. His major job responsibility has been to design and conduct country wide assessments for assessing the status of tigers, large carnivores, prey and their habitat.

Members at Large:

Adrian Treves

Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA

Adrian Treves earned his PhD at Harvard University in 1997 and is now an associate professor of Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His research focuses on agroecosystems where crop and livestock production overlap carnivore habitat. He and his students work to understand and manage the balance between human needs and carnivore conservation. With his students, he investigates conservation and ecology of wolves in Wisconsin Scandinavia dholes in Lao, problems associated with feral dogs and native foxes in Chile, and the attitudes and behaviours of the people who live alongside those carnivores. See http://faculty.nelson.wisc.edu/treves/

Amir Mahdi Ebrahimi

Oroumieh, Iran

Amir is a graduate of environmental sciences. He is a Mammalogist and conservation biologist. He has has studied mammals in Iran since 2000 and more recently has studied several species of ungulates and carnivores including wild canids. He has worked with wild canids in Iran including wolves since 2003. His research focus has been on the ecology, behaviour and conservation of these species.

Audrey Ipavec

Zoological Society of London, France

Audrey Ipavec has a PhD in environmental sciences from ENSAR (National Higher School of Agronomy of Rennes). Her PhD research looked at the characteristics and determinants of elephant population spatial distribution in the W Regional Park, West Africa. Audrey has been working in Southern and Western savannah ecosystems since 1999 and is a specialist in the management and conservation of large mammals in African protected areas. She is currently the coordinator of the Rangewide Conservation Program for Cheetahs and African Wild Dogs in western, northern and central Africa; a joint initiative of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), in partnership with the Cat and Canid Specialist Groups of the IUCN/SSC. Audrey has also spent time as a lecturer in the ecology of African Savannah dynamics, human wildlife conflict and TRAFFIC/MIKE programmes in Benin, Niger and Geneva.

Bhaskar Acharya

Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment, Bangalore, India

Bhaskar has an MSc from the Wildlife Institute of India, Dehradun. He conducted a long-term field research project (2000-2005) on the ecology of dholes in Pench Tiger Reserve, Madhya Pradesh, central India, leading to a doctoral thesis on the same. This project was an expansion of his previous work as a research scholar on a collaborative study on dholes in Kanha Tiger Reserve and in the adjacent landscapes. In addition to canid biology, he is interested in wild ungulate ecology, plant taxonomy and insect-plant interactions. He is currently coordinating a grant-making program for the conservation of biological diversity of the Western Ghats Region of India.

Cheryl Asa

Saint Louis Zoo, USA

Cheryl, Director of Reproductive and Behavioral Sciences, began canid research in Peru in 1981 with the Sechuran desert fox. She has since conducted studies of grey and Mexican grey wolves, fennec foxes, painted dogs, coyotes, and island foxes. In 1990 she was asked by the US Fish & Wildlife Service to establish a semen bank for the Mexican gray wolf, which has expanded to include eggs and ovarian tissue from females. In the late 1990s she became part of the island fox recovery team, to monitor behavior and hormones of the captive breeding population on the islands. Her lab has pioneered assisted reproduction methods for management of Mexican wolf population genetics and has identified factors affecting fertility across canid species. Her comparative canid research focuses on reproductive strategies and mechanisms (e.g., induced ovulation) and on application of reproductive management (e.g., artificial insemination) to conservation.

Colleen Begg

The Ratel Trust / Niassa Carnivore Project, Mozambique

Born and raised in South Africa, Colleen earned a MSc on a population viability analysis of the translocation of cheetah into Matusadona NP, Zimbabwe and a PhD in 2001 on the ecology of honey badgers in the Kagalagadi Transfrontier Reserve, South Africa. She is passionate about carnivores, field based conservation, and finding practical, locally derived solutions to conservation threats. Together with husband Keith they have worked on carnivores in South Africa, Zimbabwe, Tanzania and Mozambique. In 2003, they founded the Niassa Carnivore Project in Niassa Reserve, Mozambique with a goal to secure large carnivores (lions, spotted hyaenas, African wild dogs and leopards) using a four-pronged approach of research, direct mitigation and implementation of solutions, education, and mentorship and capacity building.

David Rabon

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, USA

David is a conservation biologist interested in the restoration, conservation and management of endangered species, particularly wild canids and other carnivores. His focal research areas include the behavioural ecology, reproduction and social behaviour of wild canids; intra- and inter-species relationships; population assessment and species-habitat relationships; mitigation of human-predator conflicts; and, resolution of complex problems related to carnivore management. David serves as the Coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Red Wolf Recovery Program, where he is committed to the restoration and recovery of the critically endangered red wolf.

Dean Cluff

Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada

Dean is a wildlife biologist for the territorial government and works with a variety of mammals. His main interest lies with carnivore ecology and management, primarily with wolves and bears. Dean has been a member of the IUCN Wolf Specialist group since 2001 until it joined with the Canid Specialist Group. Dean studies tundra- denning wolves that follow migratory barren-ground caribou to their winter range in the boreal forest. Dean has also accompanied Dr. David Mech on several occasions to the High Arctic to study wolves there.

Denise Taylor

Education 4 Conservation Limited, Warwickshire, UK

Denise is an environmental educator, entrepreneur, author and wildlife conservationist with many years of experience working with NGOs and academic institutions throughout the UK, Europe and North America on wildlife conservation projects and issues. In 2003, she founded E4C (www.education4conservation.org) which provides resources for conservation educators throughout the world. E4C also acts as a partner organization with other NGOs to maximize funding opportunities for the benefit of wildlife conservation, education strategy and development, community capacity building and helping to alleviate conflict situations involving predators and livestock depredation. She is also a Specialist Advisor at the UK Wolf Conservation Trust, helping to raise awareness of wolf conservation issues throughout Europe and North America.

Djuro Huber

University of Zagreb, Croatia

Djuro graduated in veterinary medicine in Zagreb, Croatia in 1975, and specialized in ecology (master’s degree) and in wildlife parasitology (PhD in 1979). Since 1981 he is conducting a brown bear study in Croatia, which in 1996 expanded to wolf and lynx. He led over 15 international projects and contributes to wolf management in Croatia. Professional activities include: IUCN SSC Bear Specialist Group and Wolf Specialist Group, IBA, Large Carnivore Initiative for Europe, Wildlife Disease Association. Djuro is currently the professor of Biology at the Department of Biology of the Veterinary Faculty in Zagreb.

Doug Smith

Yellowstone National Park, USA

Doug is a Senior Wildlife Biologist in Yellowstone National Park and has been involved with wolf restoration there since 1994. Besides Yellowstone he has also worked with wolves on Isle Royale, in Minnesota, and Indiana (captive). He is a member of the Mexican Wolf Recovery Team and the IUCN Re-Introduction Specialist Group. His main interest is wolf conservation, wolf-prey ecology and population dynamics. He has a Ph.D. from the University of Nevada, Reno, a MS from Michigan Technological University and a BS from the University of Idaho.

Eduardo Silva-Rodriguez

Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago, Chile

Eduardo has experience working with South American gray fox (chilla) and Darwin’s fox. He has worked on issues related to the human-canid conflict associated to small agriculture and the interactions of wild mammals, foxes included, with domestic dogs. He has recently been part of a team that discovered a new Darwin’s fox population, halfway between the previously known populations.

Eric Gese

USDA/National Wildlife Research Center; Utah State University, USA

Eric is a Research Wildlife Biologist with the National Wildlife Research Center and Associate Professor in the Department of Wildland Resources at Utah State University. He has conducted research on the behaviour, ecology and management of wild canids, mainly wolves, coyotes and foxes, for close to 30 years.

Etotépé A. Sogbohossou

University of Abomey-Calavi, Benin (West Africa)

Etotépé has a PhD in Conservation Biology from Leiden Univqersity. Assistant professor at the University of Abomey-Calavi, she is involved in carnivores and endangered wildlife species research and conservation and local communities’ education.

Fabrize Cuzin

Morocco

Fabrize Cuzin has been evaluating the status of mammals in Morocco and consequently proposing management and conservation measures for key species since 1994. Gaining his PhD in 2003 he has continued to collect information compiling and maintaining a database with thousands of records.

Felix Knauer

Austria

Felix is a scientist at the Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology, department of integrative biology and evolution at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna. His fields of expertise include carnivores, wildlife ecology (habitat selection and animal movement in particular), land use/and cover dynamics and LULc Modelling, remote sensing and GIS applications in forestry, protected areas, evolution, population ecology, spatial ecology, ecological modelling and biostatics. Species of interest have included the Eurasian Lynx, brown bears and Gray wolf. Examples of some of his research involvements include study of livestock protection methods and non-lethal solution for wolves in Germany and the recovery of large carnivores in human dominated landscapes.

Flávio H.G. Rodrigues

Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais and Instituto Pró-Carnívoros, Brazil

Flavio is an associate professor at Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil and is associated to the Pro- Carnivoros Institute. His research has included the ecology and conservation of tropical mammals in the Brazilian Cerrado and he has studied Manned wolf ecology since 1996. He is also a researcher in the Assessor Group of the National Plan for Manned Wolf conservation in Brazil.

Francisco Fonseca

Portugal

Francisco has a PhD in Ecology and Systematics from the University of Lisbon where he works as assistant professor at the Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental changes. He is also president of the board of the Grupo Lobo (NGO Wolf Group). His research focus is in wolf ecology and conservation and Iberian wolf conservation. Subjects of interest include; ecology and predator-prey relationships, impacts of roads on habitat fragmentation and wolf mortality, wolf population dynamics, molecular genetics, GIS habitat suitability analyses and practical conservation measures and mitigation techniques in conjunction with the development of environmental education programmes. On-going work on the LIFE project MED-WOLF focuses on best practices for wolf conservation in Mediterranean-type areas. He is also looking at the usefulness of spatial modelling of human pressure for Iberian wolf conservation through the identification of ecological corridors to link protected areas.

Frederico (Fred) Gemesio Lemos

Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiás, Brazil

With studies focused on the foraging group size in hoary fox and crab-eating fox, Federico obtained a BSc degree and a MSc degree (2007) from Federal University of Uberlândia. Since 2007, he has been a teacher in the Biology Department at Federal University of Goiás. In 2012 he started his PhD on the spatial ecology of the hoary fox and interactions with crab-eating foxes and maned wolf. He is also interested in hoary fox parental/dispersal behaviour and species conservation. Since 2009 he has co-coordinated the Triângulo Mineiro Puma project. In 2009, together with Fernanda Cavalcanti de Azevedo, he created the Cerrado Mammals Conservation Program. He is also a collaborator of the Brazilian Environmental Agency.

Gary Roemer

New Mexico State University, USA

Gary hails from Wisconsin where his father's love for the outdoors fostered an appreciation for nature that has been a driving force throughout his life. He received his BS from the University of Wisconsin, a MSc in Wildlife Biology from Humboldt State University and a PhD in Biology from UCLA. His dissertation focused on the ecology and conservation of the island fox, which later formed the biological cornerstone for saving three subspecies from extinction. His current research centers on the ecology and conservation of mammals in the southwestern US and includes an exploration of intraguild predation in kit foxes and coyotes and the spread of rabies in grey foxes.

Gianetta (Netty) Purchase

Zoological Society of London and Wildlife Conservation Society, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

Gianetta (Netty) has been working to conserve cheetahs and other large carnivores for 12 years, focussing initially in her home country of Zimbabwe, but now working throughout the Southern Africa region. Her main focus for the last five years has been to link research to management in the field of carnivore conservation and mitigating human-carnivore conflict.

Gregory (Greg) Rasmussen

Painted Dog Research Trust

Greg has worked on the morphology, demography, ecology and conservation of the African wild dog since 1989. His data have facilitated the determination of energy budgets for this species and he is working on the relationship between energy intake and extirpation. Due to persecution and bounties over the last 100 years, he also sees “bottlenecks” as a serious concern. Consequently, he has been investigating coat patterns and morphological changes (skull ratios, dentition and fluctuating asymmetry. With advances in modern DNA techniques, the possibility of integrating this genetic component is now possible and he hopes to interface of ecology, demography, morphology and conservation genetics and integrate this into GIS based landscape planning.

Guillaume Chapron

Grimsö Wildlife Research Station, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden

Guillaume is a quantitative ecologist interested in carnivore conservation. His area of expertise is in population dynamics, the variation in time of abundance and range of a population. Most of his work has involved developing several population models and population viability analysis (PVA), used to define, assess or improve conservation and management strategies, in collaboration with field projects.

Gus Mills

SAN Parks, South Africa

Gus studied large carnivores, mainly in the Kgagalagadi Transfrontier and Kruger National Parks, over a forty year period (1972-2012). During this time he ran the Kruger Park wild dog project from 1989 until he retired in 2006. He was the founder and first chair of the South African Wild Dog Action Group (WAG).

Hans de Longh

Institute of Environmental Sciences Leiden, The Netherlands

Hans is a large carnivore researcher with a long-term experience in Africa. He has worked on the African wild dog and other large carnivores in West and Central Africa since 1990. He has a long standing experience with IUCN and the IUCN network, through Chairmanship of the National Committee between 1990 and 2000 and as Vice Chair from 2000 until 2003. Hans is a very active member of the IUCN Species Survival Commission Steering Committee. He has contributed to a wide range of publications and workshops on large carnivore conservation and organized European seminar on the harmonization of Red Lists and several workshops on conservation strategies for elephants, lions, African wild dogs and dugongs.

Harriet Davies-Mostert

Endangered Willdife Trust, South Africa

Harriet is Head of Conservation at the Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) in South Africa, responsible for ensuring that biodiversity data and research are effectively incorporated into conservation action. Born in Zimbabwe, she completed undergraduate studies in Canada before returning to do a Master’s degree at the University of Zimbabwe on an African wild dog reintroduction into Matusadona NP. Harriet joined the EWT in 1999, undertaking and then overseeing several African wild dog projects across SA. Her PhD at Oxford University’s WildCRU examined the effectiveness of SA’s managed metapopulation strategy for African wild dogs. Harriet is Chairperson (since 2006) of the Wild Dog Advisory Group (SA) which coordinates the managed wild dog metapopulation. She is Chair of the IUCN South Africa National Committee, President of the Southern African Wildlife Management Association, and an Extraordinary Lecturer at University of Pretoria’s Centre for Wildlife Management.

J Weldon (Tico) McNutt

Botswana Predator Conservation Trust, Botswana

Tico is the founder and director of The Botswana Predator Conservation Trust which was set up as the Botwana Wild Dog Research Project in 1989 and is now one of the longest running conservation research projects in Africa covering all the large carnivore species in Botswana. Tico completed his PhD in Animal Behaviour from the University of California whilst starting his work in the Okavango Delta in 1989. His work on the African wild dog in particular has helped to move this species away from misunderstanding and persecution. Tico and his wife supervise a team of researchers and graduate students who undertake the projects ongoing work in carnivore research and conservation. They manage a research camp in the Eastern side of the Okavango Delta that has been operating since 1990.They also manage a wildlife biochemistry laboratory in the village of Maun along with an expanding children’s wildlife education program called Coaching for Conservation.

Jaime R Rau

Universidad de Los Lagos, Osorno, Chile

Jaime was born in Santiago de Chile. He holds a MSc in Ecology (1980) from Austral University of Chile and a PhD in Biological Sciences (1988) from University of Sevilla, Spain. His thesis work was on red fox ecology and was carried out in the Estación Biológica de Doñana. He has been a visiting professor/researcher at European and Central and South American universities/research centres. At present, he is an animal population ecology professor at the MSc and PhD programs in Management and Conservation of Natural Resources at Universidad de Los Lagos in Osorno, southern Chile. He has written several papers on the ecology and conservation of European and South American foxes (genus Pseudalopex).

Jan Kamler

WildCRU, University of Oxford, UK

Jan is a research associate at WildCRU, where he has studied canid ecology and conservation since 2004, with projects on cape foxes, bat-eared foxes, and black-backed jackals in South Africa, and projects on dholes in Bhutan, Laos, and Cambodia. His current project focuses on the ecology and interactions of dholes and golden jackals in eastern Cambodia. Prior to WildCRU, Jan studied coyote ecology in Kansas for this MS, the ecology and relationships of swift foxes and coyotes in Texas for his PhD, and red deer-wolf relationships in Bialowieza, Poland, for a postdoc. His main ecological interests are carnivore interactions and predator-prey relationships. He is also interested in the trophic cascades caused by large carnivores, especially how larger carnivores affect the ecology of smaller carnivores and their prey. More generally, he is interested in promoting carnivore conservation and sustainable development, especially through training and capacity building in developing countries.

Ludwig (Lu) Carbyn

University of Alberta , Department of Renewable Resources, Edmonton Alberta, Canada

Lu Carbyn is an emeritus research scientist with the Canadian Federal Department of the Environment and an adjunct Professor with the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. He has worked with the Canadian Wildlife Service for 33 years, published / edited 5 book on canids and 150 scientific papers on the subject. He was awarded the William A. Rowan distinguished Service award from the Wildlife Society and the Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee medal for his work as a scientist and for conservation of nature. He served on overseas assignments in Portugal, Mexico and Poland and was involved as an advisor / consultant in the Yellowstone wolf reintroduction program.

Melissa Rodden

Smithsonian Institution - National Zoological Park, USA

Melissa Rodden works in species survival at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) as a wildlife bio-technician. She has coordinated the Manned Wolf SSP (MWSSP) since its inception. Research activities supported by the MWSSP have focused on captive husbandry concerns, reproductive behaviour and physiology, parental behaviour, infant behaviour and development, nutrition, and health issues. Current focuses are in the development of materials for zoo and wildlife educators and support for field conservation initiatives in Brazil.

Ozgun Emre Can

WildCRU, University of Oxford, UK

Emre is a conservation biologist specialized in designing and implementing studies that address real-world conservation issues facing carnivores and proposing evidence-based solutions to these challenges. He has worked to better understand the status of carnivores in Turkey since 1997 and initiated the first field-based study on grey wolves (as well as on brown bears, striped hyaenas and wildcats). He has worked with researchers, communities and policy makers to encourage the long-term coexistence of large carnivores and people in Greece, Turkey, Georgia, US, Romania and Nepal. He is currently researching how human-wolf interaction differs in people’s culture in Central Asia compared to Western culture and whether this information can guide us in planning the future of carnivore conservation. His current research also focuses on clouded leopards, tigers and bears. He has active roles in other Specialist Groups and the International Association for Bear Research and Management.

Peter Lindsey

Mammal Research Institute, South Africa

Peter Lindsey has a PhD in Zoology from the University of Pretoria’s Mammal Research Institute and is the Policy Initiative Coordinator for Panthera’s Lion Program. His PhD thesis evaluated the social and economic determinants of success for conserving African wild dogs outside of protected areas in South Africa. He has continued to work on this species in both Kenya and Zimbabwe. His research interests and expertise in practical conservation include illegal hunting and the bush meat trade, trophy hunting, human-wildlife conflict, wildlife-based land uses as well a predator conservation. A particular focus has been in conserving predators outside of protected areas and methods to reduce edge-effects within the parks themselves. He has worked across many southern and east African countries conducting research and has implemented a range of practical conservation interventions.

Petter Wabakken

Directorate for Nature Management, Norway

Peter is director for Nature Management based in Norway. His research interests and expertise lie in large carnivore ecology and management, human-carnivore interactions and wolf social behaviour in particular. He is a current member of the IUCN Wolf Specialist group and conducts several large-carnivore research projects. He has also worked on brown bears (founder of the Scandinavian Brown Bear Research Project), eagle owls and baleen whales. Research interests include population structure & dynamics, molecular ecology, behavioural ecology, multiple predator communities.

Rachel Roberts

IUCN Species Survival Commission, UK

Rachel Roberts is the SSC Network Coordinator based at the UNEP-WCMC office in Cambridge. Rachel has a Masters in Ecology and Environmental Management from the University of York. She has extensive experience in conservation and plays a crucial supporting role to the IUCN SSC Specialist Groups, the SSC Network as a whole and the SSC Chair to deliver IUCN Species Strategic Plans and to contribute to new and on-going SSC programmes. Rachel plays a key role in communication and coordination between the main groups and works with specialist groups on letters of intervention to influence government actions where they may impact threatened species. She is also Project Manager of the Amazing Species web initiative.

Raquel Godinho

CIBIO/University of Porto Campus Agrário de Vairão, Portugal

Raquel completed her PhD in Evolutionary Biology at the University of Lisbon in 2004. She then moved to CIBIO (Research Centre in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources) at the University of Porto where she co-chairs the Conservation Genetics research group. She has been working with the conservation of canids since 2007, with a special emphasis on the wolf. In particular, she is interested in the analysis of the impact of hybridization between domestic dogs and wolves in Iberia and other regions of the world. More recently, she has also been involved in the conservation genetics of several other canid species from both Europe and Africa.

Rob Williams

Independent Ecologist

Rob is a conservation ecologist specializing in Latin American protected area management and threatened species conservation. He has worked in conservation and eco-tourism since 1990 as a biologist, conservationist, photographer, writer and guide. He worked in Peru for Frankfurt Zoological Society’s Peru Programme supporting the management and protection of nine protected areas totalling over 9 million hectares in southeastern Peru. In addition he is involved in conservation research projects on threatened species including Andean condor, white-winged guan, Andean bear, maned wolf and giant otter. He is also the scientific director for the award-winning Chaparri Reserve, the first community-owned private conservation area in Peru.

Robert Steinmetz

WWF Thailand

Rob is a conservation biologist with World Wildlife Fund Thailand and has worked in Southeast Asia for 25 years. His work with canids has been in Thailand and Lao PDR, focused on Asiatic Jackal and Dhole. He conducts research into the ecology of these canids, with emphasis on their feeding habits and competitive interactions with other carnivores (e.g. tigers). Of special interest is the effect of prey depletion (from poaching) on these aspects. He also works with protected area staff and local people to implement collaborative wildlife recovery programs as a response to the poaching crisis in Asia.

Rosemary Groom

Zimbabwe

Rosemary is a highly motivated conservation biologist with 14 years of experience working in wildlife conservation in East and Southern Africa. Since early 2008, she has worked to conserve African wild dogs in southern Zimbabwe, for the African Wildlife Conservation Fund. Her areas of expertise include working at local, regional and international scales with a variety of stakeholders on conservation issues and designing, implementing and managing large scale field and education projects, particularly pertaining to wild canid conservation. In 2013 she became the Southern African Coordinator for the Range Wide Conservation Program for Cheetah and Wild Dogs (ZSL / WCS) and works across the Southern African region to coordinate and support conservation efforts for African wild dog and cheetah.

Simon Hedges

Wildlife Conservation Society, UK

Simon has extensive experience of wildlife conservation-related research and survey work, endangered species and protected area management, and wildlife policy formulation, including the writing and implementation of wildlife action plans. Areas of expertise include human-wildlife conflict, ecology, nature resource management, survey methods, conservation genetics and endangered species conservation. He is currently WCS’s Asian Elephant coordinator. He was a member of the IUCN/SSC Species Conservation Planning Task Force and is currently member of the IUCN Red List Technical Working Group and the joint Technical Advisory Group (TAG) of the CITES Monitoring the Illegal Killing of Elephants (MIKE) program and the Elephant Trade Information System (ETIS). He is a current member of the Canid specialist group and has published papers in various journals ranging from Molecular Ecology, Conservation Biology, and Journal of Animal Ecology to Tropical Biodiversity, Kukila, and Gajah.

Tim Watcher

Zoological Society of London /Institute of Zoology, UK

Tim Wacher is a Wildlife Biologist with the Zoological Society of London and is their current lead scientist on the Pan Sahara Wildlife Survey project. Tim has spent over 20 years working in aridlands conservation and has been involved in gazelle and Oryx reintroduction in Saudi Arabia as well as extensive fieldwork on antelopes and other Saharan wildlife in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Egypt, Niger and Chad. As the founding board member of the Sahara Conservation Fund (SCF) he currently works as ZSL’s lead scientist on the Pan Sahara Wildlife Survey Project (PSWS) whose long-term goal is to improve the conservation status of the highly threatened yet poorly known wildlife of the Sahara and bordering Sahel regions of Africa. The work has provided valuable data reports on a variety of species including wild dogs as well as the golden jackal, Rüppell’s fox, pale fox and fennec fox.

Janice Koler-Matznick

The New Guinea Singing Dog Conservation Society, USA

Janice has worked with captive New Guinea dingoes (NGDs) since 1995 and established the New Guinea Singing Dog Conservation Society in 1995. Since 1996 she has been the studbook keeper for North American NGDs. In addition, she is an Animal Behavior Society board certified applied animal behaviourist specializing in canids. Her other areas of interest are canid ethology and ecology, canid taxonomy and nomenclature and the origin of the dog (dingoes and domesticated dogs).

Jean-Baptiste Mamang-Kanga

Directeur de la Faune et des Aires Proteges, Central African Republic

Jean-Marc Weber

Service de la faune, des forêts et la nature NE (SFFN), Switzerland

Jean-Marc is a wildlife biologist who has studied red foxes for approximately 15 years, including the social organization of rural red foxes in a mountainous habitat and the effect of mange on urban fox ecology. In addition, from 1999 to 2010 he was in charge of the national monitoring of wolf return to Switzerland, including damage prevention and public information. His current position as head of the fish and wildlife service of the Canton Neuchâtel (western Switzerland) has him involved in in a diverse set of problems regarding wild canids (red fox, wolf, raccoon dog).

John Vucetich

Michigan Technological University, USA

John is an associate professor of animal ecology at Michigan Technological University. He also leads the Isle Royale Wolf-Moose Project, the longest continuous study of any predator-prey system in the world. He has authored more than 75 scholarly publications on a range of topics, including wolf-prey ecology, extinction risk, population genetics and environmental philosophy. His contributions to the wolf-moose project have been officially recognized by the United States Senate. He has also collaborated with wolf researchers from Canada, Sweden and Yellowstone, and has served on the Mexican wolf recovery team for more than a decade.

Jorge Servin

Mexico

José Vicente Lopez Bao

Research Unit of Biodiversity (UO/CSIC/PA), Oviedo University, Mieres, Spain

José is an ecologist with a Ph.D. in conservation biology. His career has spanned several canid species. He is interested in linking behaviour with conservation and management disciplines, with a special focus on the effects of anthropogenic activities on carnivores and on human-carnivore conflicts. His main study model is the wolf of the Iberian Peninsula, a paradigmatic example to understand the adaptations of both wolves and humans to the coexistence and its consequences. He is also interested in general patterns of wolf ecology and management. His aim is to generate scientific-knowledge that can be used to inform managers, policy-makers and other interested stakeholders.

Juan Carlos Blanco

Proyecto Lobo, CBC, Spain

Juan Carlos is a Spanish biologist with a Ph.D. in animal ecology, working as a consultant on large carnivores and other mammals. He has been studying wolves since 1987 and he is particularly interested in wolf ecology and wolf-human conflicts, including wolf adaptation to modified habitats, prevention of damage to livestock and wolf perception by different social groups. He has directed several wolf projects including the impact of four-lane highways on wolves, the expansion of a wolf populations in agricultural areas, and the relationship of wolves and humans. He prepared the first technical draft of the Spanish Action Plan for Wolves and worked with the Spanish Ministry of the Environment coordinating this Plan from 2005 to 2011.

Kaarina Kauhala

Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Turku, Finland

Kaarina has studied the ecology of raccoon dogs and red foxes since 1986 in Finland. She has studied the spread of the alien raccoon dog to Finland, its population dynamics and impact on native fauna. Her studies include home range, habitat and diet analyses, and analyses of niche overlap between medium-sized carnivores. She has also collected ecological knowledge needed for rabies models with two vector species. Recently, she has been involved in a study of urban ecology of foxes in the city of Turku, SW Finland.

Kaveh Hatami

Iranian Cheetah Society, Iran

Kaveh has a MSc in Environment Management. He is employed by the Environment and Sustainable Agriculture office (http://esao.areo.ir). He has been involved with developing the guidelines for biosafety protocols for national guidelines (2007-2014) and climate change convention (2007-2012). From 2007-2011, he was the projects coordinator for the AG. Sector Kyoto Protocol and Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). He continues his involvement as a member of the national CDM committee. He is involved with various public awareness activities, including designing targeted education courses. He is a grey wolf consultant for a variety of groups, including mass media, university professors, students, and herdmen.

Koenraad de Smet

Department of the Environment, Belgium

Laura Prugh

Institute of Arctic Biology - University of Alaska Fairbanks, USA

Laura’s research focuses broadly on wildlife community ecology and multi-species conservation and management. She has studied coyotes in Alaska since 1999 and currently studies wolves, coyotes, red foxes and other small carnivores in interior Alaska. Her research focuses on issues such as mesopredator release, predator-prey interactions, impacts of fur harvest and wolf control and impacts of climate change.

Mamadou Sidibe

Direction des Parcs Nationaux du Sénégal, Parc National du Niokolo-Koba, Senegal

Maria Renata Leite Pitman

Center for Tropical Conservation - Duke University, USA

Renata, a wildlife veterinarian with a master in Forest Sciences, has work in tropical conservation for the last 25 years. Since 2000 she has worked with the Center for Tropical Conservation/ Duke University in Peruvian Amazon studying the elusive short-eared dog and directing a large wildlife conflict-solving project at the Interoceanic Highway. In Brazil, she directs her own reserve in the Atlantic Forest, where she created her own research centre and teaches landscape ecology at Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Parana. Her work gave scientific basis for the creations of four new protected areas in Brazil and one in Peru.

Marsha Sovada

USGS-Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, USA

Marsha’s primary areas of research interests include predation management in prairie ecosystem, ecology of endangered/threatened carnivores, and ecology of breeding grassland birds. She has been a member of the Swift Fox Conservation Team since 1996 and since 1998 has served on several committees working toward recovery of island foxes. Her research has included evaluation of the interactions of red fox and coyotes, interaction of red fox and swift fox; ecology and development of monitoring techniques for swift fox, assessment of swift fox distribution and evaluation of island fox reproduction in a captive population.

Matthew (Matt) Becker

Zambian Carnivore Programme, Zambia

Matt represents the Zambian Carnivore Programme which, in collaboration with the Zambia Wildlife Authority, conducts long-term research and conservation activities on three African wild dog populations in the Luangwa valley, Kafue and Liuwa ecosystems. In addition, the Programme provides employment, training and advanced education to current and future Zambian wildlife professionals. Wild dog work includes assessing population status, trends, predator guild and predator-prey dynamics, combatting snaring and the bushmeat trade and assessing trends and patterns of human encroachment in protected area networks. He previously researched grey wolves in Yellowstone National Park and African wild dogs in Botswana.

Megan Parker

Working Dogs for Conservation, USA

Megan began working on canids during the reintroduction of grey wolves to the western United States and conducting wolf surveys in Mongolia. Her dissertation work on African wild dogs in northern Botswana, focused on scent marking behaviour and chemistry and territoriality in this species. She is Director of Research with Working Dogs for Conservation, developing better ways for detection dogs to provide conservation and research information. Her interests lie in how canids partition space and how they communicate, in order to better understand how to reduce conflicts with humans.

Midori Saeki

National Agricultural Research Center, Japan

Midori is a researcher of Wildlife Management Lab., National Agricultural Research Center in Japan. She graduated from California University of Pennsylvania, did her master at University of Maine and wrote her doctor thesis on the raccoon dogs in Japan at WildCRU, University of Oxford. She is a chief of Tanuki Club (http://www.tanuki-club.com).

Muhammad Sajid Nadeem

PMAS-Arid Agriculture University, Pakistan

Muhammad is working as Assistant Professor in Zoology Department, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi Pakistan. He has been involved in field studies since 1994. His focus is on population studies, habitat evaluation, food preferences, breeding ecology and conservation. As in other regions of the world, the canids in Pakistan are declining rapidly; he is studying the population and dietary preferences of these canids through pellet analysis.

Ngakoutou Etienne Bémadjim

Direction National DES Parcs Nationaux Du Chad, Chad

Ngakoutou is an engineer of water and forestry with a specialized Masters in the management of protected areas. He is the curator of Parc National de Séna-Oura. He has a strong desire to do a thesis with the African wild dog in Central Africa.

Nicholas (Nick) Mitchell

Wildlife Conservation Society and Zoological Society of London; Tanzania Carnivore Centre, Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute, Arusha, Tanzania

Nick’s work on the conservation of the African wild dog in East Africa is paired with that of the cheetah as part of the Rangewide Programme for Cheetah and Wild Dog Conservation. While he is now based in Tanzania, his work of the last decade has been spread across the region, mostly Kenya, Uganda and Ethiopia. His main focus has been the interface between science and conservation especially community-based and participatory natural resource management. His doctoral research used GIS to investigate long-term land use change and anthropogenic disturbance in the region.

Paul Paquet

University of Victoria, Canada and Raincoast Conservation Foundation, B.C., Canada

Paul is a Professor at University of Victoria and Senior Scientist with Raincoast Conservation Foundation, where he supervises graduate student research. He is an internationally recognized authority on wolves, with research experience in several regions of the world. He has been conducting field research on wolves, coyotes, and foxes since 1972, with interest in canine behaviour, applied ecology, epidemiology, and environmental philosophy. Paul has published numerous scholarly articles on the ecology, behaviour, and conservation of large carnivores, including three books on wolves. His current research focuses on conservation of wolves and the effects of human activities on their survival.

Paula White

Center for Tropical Research – University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), USA

Since 1988, Paula has been studying the arctic fox on Alaskan Islands. The earliest work, which constituted her Master’s degree, focused on sociobehaviour of the Pribilof Fox, an endemic subspecies of Alaska’s Pribilof Islands. Concerns over the welfare of the Pribilof fox have led to continued research emphasizing disease, human/wildlife conflict and conservation. She has also studied naturally occurring populations of arctic fox on Hall Island and the introduced Alopex on Shemya Island, the latter of which are now believed to have originated from Commander Island stock. Her previous work includes gray wolf and Channel Island fox. Current projects include African wild dog and side-striped jackal in Zambia.

Rurik List

Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Lerma, Estado de México, Mexico

Rurik is a Conservation Biologist working on the ecology and conservation of carnivores and species at risk, as well as in species’ reintroductions and identification of conservation priorities. He has conducted ecological research on kit fox, grey fox and coyote, and being part of the reintroduction of Mexican wolf. He devotes time to outreach activities about conservation issues through public presentations, photo exhibitions and publications for the general public. He is Head of the Department of Environmental Sciences at the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Lerma in Mexico, and president of the Latin American and Caribbean section of the Society for Conservation Biology.

Scott Creel

Montana State University, USA

Scott has studied the ecology, behaviour and conservation of several carnivores since the 1980s, including African wild dogs and grey wolves. He has recently worked on predator-prey dynamics in wolves and elk, the additivity of human wolf harvesting and assessments of population size, and limiting factors for African wild dogs in Zambia.

Todd Fuller

University of Massachusetts, USA

Todd and his students have conducted field and captive studies on population biology, distribution and behaviour of common and endangered canids in North America (e.g., grey foxes, grey wolves, coyotes, island foxes), South America (culpeo and grey fox), Africa (jackals and wild dogs) and Asia (dholes). He has also contributed to numerous state, federal and international efforts to understand and direct canid management (predator control, state management plans), recovery (restoration) and conservation (endangered species plans, centers).

Wang Zhenghuan

East China Normal University, China

Zelealem Tefera Ashenafi

Frankfurt Zoological Society, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Zelealem worked in the Bale Mountains National Park in the 1980s, where he first encountered Ethiopian wolves. He attended the College of African Wildlife Management in Tanzania, and did his MSc and PhD at the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE), University of Kent. A Darwin Initiative project looking at the ecology of Ethiopian wolves and communal natural resource management practices in Menz provided the basis for his PhD at DICE. Zelealem is the Country Representative of the Frankfurt Zoological Society in Ethiopia and works on the conservation of Afroalpine areas, overseeing ecological monitoring, community-based conservation, and community-based tourism development activities in the highlands of north Ethiopia. He works closely with the Ethiopian Wolf Conservation Programme.

Zhenghuan Wang

East China Normal University, China